Posted in This is VCSSCamp

Reflections on the General Election and the new Conservative Government

I’ve recently started following Duncan Shrubsole, Director of Policy, Partnerships and Communications for Lloyds Bank Foundation for England and Wales. You can follow him on Twitter: @duncanshrubsole

Parliament

Never has the phrase “a week is a long time in politics” seemed so apt with the fallout from the 2015 election, the surprise election of a majority Conservative government and the impact on the other parties (and their leaders) still dominating the airwaves, twitter and newsprint. Amidst a sea of insight and analysis here are three reflections on what this might mean for the voluntary sector and three suggestions for how we should respond:

A. Everything changes, everything stays the same: for all the speculation as to what a majority Conservative Government means for an EU referendum, the Human Rights Act, the union or even the BBC, the reality of David Cameron being re-elected means that the core issue for this Parliament will be the same as that of the last one – the public finances. The Conservatives plans to turn a deficit of £75bn this year into a…

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Posted in This is VCSSCamp

Open Data and the voluntary sector, revisited

A post about Open Data and the voluntary sector from 2010 – good to see people were thinking about our role in relation to open data a few years ago, and longer if you read the comments!

arbitrary constant

I posted on the topic of Open Data and the voluntary sector earlier today, and I’m very grateful for the time people have taken to respond. I thought I’d jot down a response to their response in the hope of continuing the conversation.

My original post boiled down to 4 propositions:

  1. Given the novelty of Open Data in the public sector, I didn’t think people would be that interested in voluntary sector Open Data.
  2. The motivation for public sector organisations to publish their data (transparency) doesn’t necessarily hold for why a voluntary sector organisation would publish their data.
  3. The power dynamic between voluntary sector organisations and their funders means that Open Data could be used as a resource for undermining the voluntary sector.
  4. Voluntary sector organisations are extremely well placed to benefit from the publication of Open Data by public agencies.

On point 1, my commenters rightly note that I’m…

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